I am a PhD Candidate in Management and Entrepreneurship at the University of Colorado-Boulder. My research is in the areas of Entrepreneurship and Strategy. I am currently examining how communities impact entrepreneurial decision-making and action in both physical and virtual settings. I seek to empirically examine the antecedents, foundation processes, strategies, and outcomes of firms that encounter a high degree of distress or challenge.

I am currently on the job market (2014-2015 academic year) and seeking an assistant professor position in Entrepreneurship at an AACSB-accredited university. If you have questions, please reach out to me.

Entrepreneurship after Natural Disaster

Entrepreneurship after Natural Disaster

I am Joplin: Community Identity and Entrepreneurship After Natural Disasters

This paper explores the role that community social identity plays in an entrepreneur’s decisionmaking process about rebuilding her business following a natural disaster. Existing literature regarding natural disasters has focused on the financial determinants at the near exclusion of social-psychological variables, leaving a gap in the literature that our empirical study aims to address. One hundred and twelve business owners from Joplin, Missouri, which was impacted by an F-5 tornado in May 2011, have been surveyed eight months after this natural disaster. The results indicate that the constructs of interdependency belief and group attractiveness have a significant relationship with the entrepreneur’s decision to rebuild.PDF

  • Categories: Research

Research

Research Statement


Publications:

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I am Joplin: Community Identity and Entrepreneurship After Natural Disasters

with Michael Conger and Carla Bustamante, Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research, 2012, Valume 32, Issue 6

This paper explores the role that community social identity plays in an entrepreneur’s decisionmaking process about rebuilding her business following a natural disaster. Existing literature regarding natural disasters has focused on the financial determinants at the near exclusion of social-psychological variables, leaving a gap in the literature that our empirical study aims to address. One hundred and twelve business owners from Joplin, Missouri, which was impacted by an F-5 tornado in May 2011, have been surveyed eight months after this natural disaster. The results indicate that the constructs of interdependency belief and group attractiveness have a significant relationship with the entrepreneur’s decision to rebuild.PDF

  • Categories: Research

Current Working Papers:

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Spillover of Support: The Relationship between Venture Capital and Crowdfunding Activity

The long-discussed undercapitalization of entrepreneurs in the US and internationally (Ando, 1985; Evans & Jovanovic, 1989; Harrison, Love, & McMillan, 2004), combined with technological advancements and the increased usage of social media has contributed greatly to the rise of crowdfunding (Schwienbacher & Larralde, 2012). Funds raised via crowdfunding platforms are estimated to have surpassed $5 billion in 2013 (2013CF Industry Report by massolution.com). Very little literature currently exists on the phenomenon and much focus is being placed on variables occurring within the platform as it relates to funding success. Even less is known about the effects of macro-level influences and socio-cultural norms on crowdfunding. The questions of crowdfunding’s role in the capital market and its efficiency is where much debate occurs. In this study we explore the relationship between venture capital activity and crowdfunding, finding significant positive relationships between VC funds and several crowdfunding metrics. Notably, the amount of VC funds received at MSA level is positively correlated to both the number of Kickstarter projects launched per capita and the successful funding of projects. In VC distribution hubs, the amount of funds allocated is positively correlated to the average amount contributed by Kickstarter backers. These findings suggest that a spillover of entrepreneurial support from VC activity occurs within a geographic community.PDF (coming soon)

  • Categories: Research

Teaching

Teaching Statement


Teaching Evaluations


Courses Taught:

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Entrepreneurial Environments (University of Colorado-Boulder)

Upper-level elective for business majors and a requirement for ENT majors.
Introduces students to the entrepreneurial process and the ecosystem in which innovation often occurs. Addresses opportunity recognition, target markets, industry analysis, business model identification, sources of funding, managing rapid growth, and writing feasibility studies. I have also devoted a considerable portion of the class to understanding entrepreneurial leadership and crowdfunding. Throughout the semester all students will investigate and present both individual venture concepts as well as work on a team. This course is ideal for aspiring entrepreneurs but will also provide a skillset for corporate innovation.

  • Fall 2014
  • Categories: Teaching

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Critical Leadership Skills (University of Colorado-Boulder)

Upper-level elective for business majors and a requirement for HR majors.
This course is about leaders and leading. It is designed to help students think broadly about leadership and begin to prepare you for leadership positions in business, government, and non-profit organizations. The course introduces management theories of motivation, social exchange, and ethics. We also devote time to understanding how generation shifts (i.e. “X”, “Y”, “Z” and “A-O”), technology disruption, and recent trends (ex. financial crisis) influence the workplace and necessary leadership. By combining practical examples with theory, the course will provide useful guidelines for students who want to be leaders in their first post-college position and throughout their career. My goal is that students who have taken this course will be better leaders than students who have not.

  • Finalist for Leeds School of Business PhD Teaching Award for Fall 2013.
  • Fall 2012, Fall 2013 (two sections)
  • Categories: Teaching

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Benefits and Compensation (University of Colorado-Boulder)

Upper-level elective for business majors and a requirement for HR majors.
Examines theories of work motivation and relates them to the strategic use of compensation and other reward systems. Topics include procedures for managing base pay; linking pay incentives to productivity at the individual, group, and organizational levels; developing cost-effective programs of employee benefits; and the use of nonfinancial reward systems.

  • Spring 2014 (Took over at mid-point in semester for ill professor)
  • Categories: Teaching
About
  • Department: Leeds School of Business - Management and Entrepreneurship
  • Institution: University of Colorado - Boulder
  • Email: jennifer.dinger@colorado.edu
  • Phone: 479-409-5624
  • Mail: University of Colorado-Boulder
    Leeds School of Business
    UCB 419
    Boulder, CO 80309-0419

About Me

I am a doctoral candidate in management and entrepreneurship at the Leeds School of Business, at the University of Colorado in Boulder, CO.

My dissertation work at CU focuses on entrepreneurial cognition and decision-making as it relates to financial decisions, both from the crowdfunding investor and the entrepreneur perspectives.

Prior to pursuing my doctorate I worked for Walmart Stores, Inc. in Bentonville, Arkansas. During my 6+ years with the company, I worked in each of the three operating divisions: Walmart US, International and Sam’s Club Wholesale. Notably, I purchased consumer electronics and music for the 4000+ US store locations. I was involved with several due diligence projects for foreign targets, as well as the integration of several acquired companies.

My Work

Download my Curriculum Vitae